throughmotion:

guerrillamamamedicine:

shit just got real…

woah this is really good. 

(Source: byeexcess, via afterellen)

magical-tomato-chan:

friendly reminder that you don’t owe your mom kindness and love if she hasn’t shown you any, and that family members don’t automatically deserve all your respect if they treat you badly. don’t let anyone make you feel guilty about how your parents treat you.

(Source: robouji, via helvetebrann)

andrewgibby:

every lover is a storm chaser.
every good heart has lost its roof.

(via throughmotion)

voyboyfanclub:

so TERF was a term that was obviously coined by trans women and a lot of people know it as meaning “trans exclusionary radical feminist” (and i did too until just recently) but it originally stood for “trans exterminatory radical feminist” and TERFs changed the meaning of it to make it sound less horrible

so in case you needed more reason to hate TERFs there you go have some blatant silencing of trans women

(via lipstick-feminists)

revolutionaryrainbows:

bear—with—me:

Do You Love Someone With Depression?
If you have a partner or are close to someone who struggles with depression, you may not always know how to show them you love them. One day they may seem fine, and the next they are sad, distant and may push you away. It is important that you know that as a person who is close to them and trusted by them, you can help your friend or partner have shorter, less severe bouts of depression. Mental illness is as real as physical illness (it is physical actually, read more about that here) and your partner needs you as much as they would need to be cared for if they had the flu.
Your relationship may seem one-sided during these times, but by helping your partner through a very difficult and painful affliction, you are strengthening your relationship and their mental health in the long term.
1. Help them keep clutter at bay.
When a person begins spiraling into depression, they may feel like they are slowing down while the world around them speeds up. The mail may end up in stacks, dishes can pile up in the sink, laundry may go undone as the depressed person begins to feel more and more overwhelmed by their daily routine and unable to keep up. By giving your partner some extra help sorting mail, washing dishes or using paper plates and keeping chaos in check in general, you’ll be giving them (and yourself) the gift of a calm  environment. (I’m a fan of the minimalist movement because of this, you can read more about that here.)
2. Fix them a healthy meal.
Your partner may do one of two things when they are in a depressed state. They may eat very little, or they may overeat. In either case, they may find that driving through a fast food restaurant or ordering a pizza online is just easier than fixing a meal. Eating like this, or neglecting to eat will only degrade your partner’s health, causing them to go deeper into their depression. Help your loved one keep their body healthy, and their mind will follow. This is a great article that talks about the “Brain Diet” which can help the symptoms of depression, and this article talks about how our modern diet could contribute to the recent rise in depression. Here is a recipe for a trail mix that is quick to make and has mood-boosting properties.
3.Get them outside.
 The benefits of getting outside for a depressed person are huge. And it is possibly the last thing on earth your partner will want to do. Take them to be somewhere in nature. Pack a picnic and lie in the sun, take a leisurely hike or plant a garden. Being barefoot in the dirt, or “earthing” helps ground the body and reverse the effects of living in a world of emf’s, and digging in soil can actually act as an antidepressant, as a strain of bacterium in soil, Mycobacterium vaccae, triggers the release of seratonin, which in turn elevates mood and decreases anxiety. Sunshine increases Vitamin D production which can help alleviate depression. My friend Elizabeth wrote an excellent post about Vitamin D and its link to depression here.  For more information about other sources of Vitamin D, this is a great post as well as this.
4. Ask them to help you understand what they’re feeling.
If your partner is able to articulate what they are going through, it will help them and you better understand what you are dealing with, and may give insight into a plan of action for helping your partner. Also, feeling alone is common for a depressed person and anything that combats that feeling will help alleviate the severity and length of the depression.
5. Encourage them to focus on self-care.
Depressed people often stop taking care of themselves. Showering, getting haircuts, going to the doctor or dentist, it’s all just too hard, and they don’t deserve to be well taken care of anyway in their minds. This can snowball quickly into greater feelings of worthlessness since “Now I’m such a mess, no one could ever love me”. Help your loved one by being proactive. Tell them “I’m going to do the dishes, why don’t you go enjoy a bubble bath?” can give them the permission they won’t give themselves to do something normal, healthy and self-loving.
6. Hug them.
Studies show that a sincere hug that lasts longer than 20 seconds can release feel-good chemicals in the brain and elevate the mood of the giver and receiver. Depressed people often don’t want to be touched, but a sincere hug with no expectation of anything further can give your partner a lift.
7. Laugh with them.
Telling a silly joke, watching a comedy or seeing a stand up comedian will encourage your partner to laugh in spite of themselves. Laughing releases endorphins and studies show can actually counteract symptoms of depression and anxiety.
8. Reassure them that you can handle their feelings.
Your partner may be feeling worthless, angry and even guilty while they are depressed. They may be afraid that they will end up alone because no one will put up with their episodes forever. Reassure them that you are in the relationship for the long haul and they won’t scare you away because they have an illness.
9. Challenge their destructive thoughts.
A depressed person’s mind can be a never-ending loop of painful, destructive thoughts. “I’m unlovable, I’m a failure, I’m ugly, I’m stupid”. Challenge these untruths with the truth. “You’re not unlovable, I love you. You aren’t a failure, here are all the things you’ve accomplished.”
10.Remind them why you love them.
Look at pictures of happy times you’ve had together. Tell them your favorite things about them. Reminisce about your relationship and all the positive things that have happened, and remind your partner that you love them and they will get through this.
(via The Darling Bakers)

revolutionaryrainbows:

bear—with—me:

Do You Love Someone With Depression?

If you have a partner or are close to someone who struggles with depression, you may not always know how to show them you love them. One day they may seem fine, and the next they are sad, distant and may push you away. It is important that you know that as a person who is close to them and trusted by them, you can help your friend or partner have shorter, less severe bouts of depression. Mental illness is as real as physical illness (it is physical actually, read more about that here) and your partner needs you as much as they would need to be cared for if they had the flu.

Your relationship may seem one-sided during these times, but by helping your partner through a very difficult and painful affliction, you are strengthening your relationship and their mental health in the long term.

1. Help them keep clutter at bay.

When a person begins spiraling into depression, they may feel like they are slowing down while the world around them speeds up. The mail may end up in stacks, dishes can pile up in the sink, laundry may go undone as the depressed person begins to feel more and more overwhelmed by their daily routine and unable to keep up. By giving your partner some extra help sorting mail, washing dishes or using paper plates and keeping chaos in check in general, you’ll be giving them (and yourself) the gift of a calm  environment. (I’m a fan of the minimalist movement because of this, you can read more about that here.)

2. Fix them a healthy meal.

Your partner may do one of two things when they are in a depressed state. They may eat very little, or they may overeat. In either case, they may find that driving through a fast food restaurant or ordering a pizza online is just easier than fixing a meal. Eating like this, or neglecting to eat will only degrade your partner’s health, causing them to go deeper into their depression. Help your loved one keep their body healthy, and their mind will follow. This is a great article that talks about the “Brain Diet” which can help the symptoms of depression, and this article talks about how our modern diet could contribute to the recent rise in depression. Here is a recipe for a trail mix that is quick to make and has mood-boosting properties.

3.Get them outside.

 The benefits of getting outside for a depressed person are huge. And it is possibly the last thing on earth your partner will want to do. Take them to be somewhere in nature. Pack a picnic and lie in the sun, take a leisurely hike or plant a garden. Being barefoot in the dirt, or “earthing” helps ground the body and reverse the effects of living in a world of emf’s, and digging in soil can actually act as an antidepressant, as a strain of bacterium in soil, Mycobacterium vaccae, triggers the release of seratonin, which in turn elevates mood and decreases anxiety. Sunshine increases Vitamin D production which can help alleviate depression. My friend Elizabeth wrote an excellent post about Vitamin D and its link to depression here.  For more information about other sources of Vitamin D, this is a great post as well as this.

4. Ask them to help you understand what they’re feeling.

If your partner is able to articulate what they are going through, it will help them and you better understand what you are dealing with, and may give insight into a plan of action for helping your partner. Also, feeling alone is common for a depressed person and anything that combats that feeling will help alleviate the severity and length of the depression.

5. Encourage them to focus on self-care.

Depressed people often stop taking care of themselves. Showering, getting haircuts, going to the doctor or dentist, it’s all just too hard, and they don’t deserve to be well taken care of anyway in their minds. This can snowball quickly into greater feelings of worthlessness since “Now I’m such a mess, no one could ever love me”. Help your loved one by being proactive. Tell them “I’m going to do the dishes, why don’t you go enjoy a bubble bath?” can give them the permission they won’t give themselves to do something normal, healthy and self-loving.

6. Hug them.

Studies show that a sincere hug that lasts longer than 20 seconds can release feel-good chemicals in the brain and elevate the mood of the giver and receiver. Depressed people often don’t want to be touched, but a sincere hug with no expectation of anything further can give your partner a lift.

7. Laugh with them.

Telling a silly joke, watching a comedy or seeing a stand up comedian will encourage your partner to laugh in spite of themselves. Laughing releases endorphins and studies show can actually counteract symptoms of depression and anxiety.

8. Reassure them that you can handle their feelings.

Your partner may be feeling worthless, angry and even guilty while they are depressed. They may be afraid that they will end up alone because no one will put up with their episodes forever. Reassure them that you are in the relationship for the long haul and they won’t scare you away because they have an illness.

9. Challenge their destructive thoughts.

A depressed person’s mind can be a never-ending loop of painful, destructive thoughts. “I’m unlovable, I’m a failure, I’m ugly, I’m stupid”. Challenge these untruths with the truth. “You’re not unlovable, I love you. You aren’t a failure, here are all the things you’ve accomplished.”

10.Remind them why you love them.

Look at pictures of happy times you’ve had together. Tell them your favorite things about them. Reminisce about your relationship and all the positive things that have happened, and remind your partner that you love them and they will get through this.

(via The Darling Bakers)

(Source: forgottenawesome)

freedominwickedness:

saturnineaqua:

intheindigo:

shanellbklyn:

historicaltimes:

Babies are strapped into airplane seats enroute to LAX during “Operation Babylift” with airlifted orphans from Vietnam to the US. April 12, 1975.

This looks dangerous as fuck 😒

ikr? I was thinking how they would not have been secure if the plane crashed only to find out that one of the planes in the operation did crash.

what?!

Most of the babies taken to the United States by “Operation Babylift” were not orphans in the first place; they were children from refugee camps who were fraudulently designated as orphans by American relief workers — most of them with religious affiliations — who believed they’d be “better off” being raised by white Americans.
Operation Reunite is an amazing nonprofit run by Babylift victims which seeks to use DNA testing to find and reconnect with their real families back home in Vietnam.

freedominwickedness:

saturnineaqua:

intheindigo:

shanellbklyn:

historicaltimes:

Babies are strapped into airplane seats enroute to LAX during “Operation Babylift” with airlifted orphans from Vietnam to the US. April 12, 1975.

This looks dangerous as fuck 😒

ikr? I was thinking how they would not have been secure if the plane crashed only to find out that one of the planes in the operation did crash.

what?!

Most of the babies taken to the United States by “Operation Babylift” were not orphans in the first place; they were children from refugee camps who were fraudulently designated as orphans by American relief workers — most of them with religious affiliations — who believed they’d be “better off” being raised by white Americans.

Operation Reunite is an amazing nonprofit run by Babylift victims which seeks to use DNA testing to find and reconnect with their real families back home in Vietnam.

(via dentonsocialists)

"You asked me if I believed in eternal love. Love is something way too abstract and indefinable. It depends on what we perceive and what we experience. If we don’t exist, it doesn’t exist. And we change so much; love must change as well. Love catches fire, it trespasses, it breaks, we break, it comes back to life… We come back to life. Love may not be eternal, but it can make us eternal. Beyond death, the love that we shared continues to live."

— Clem, Blue is the Warmest Color (via bexkiddo)

delusioninabox:

Daily #481! Probably why I don’t have many friends.

(via awkqueered)

Tags: ohmygoooood me

"Lifestyle feminism ushered in the notion that there could be as many versions of feminism as there were women. Suddenly the politics was being slowly removed from feminism. And the assumption prevailed that no matter what a woman’s politics, be she conservative or liberal, she too could fit feminism into her existing lifestyle. Obviously this way of thinking has made feminism more acceptable because its underlying assumption is that women can be feminists without fundamentally challenging and changing themselves or the culture."

— bell hooks, Feminism is for Everybody (via excelenciatropical)

(Source: mahakavi, via stfufauxminists)

mymodernmet:

24-year-old photographer Asher Svidensky recently traveled to west Mongolia with the intention of documenting the lives of traditional Kazakh eagle hunters, people who tame eagles for the purpose of hunting smaller animals.

With the traditions typically laying in the hands of the boys and the men, the biggest surprise throughout the journey was Svidensky’s discovery of a young eagle huntress, 13-year-old Ashol Pan, the daughter of an experienced eagle hunter. These stunning photographs symbolize the potential future of the eagle hunting tradition as it expands beyond a male-only practice.

(via bonafideloverrr)

Tags: COOL Mongolia

sweet-deer:

aunteeblazer:

groudon:

i like this but i don’t fully understand it…

whoa

you don’t understand how sad this is. each adult is a cross, and each child has been crucified by said cross. 

  • the priest (i assume he’s a priest, correct me if i’m wrong) killed the little boy in one way or another, probably rape, which is common among corrupted clergy men. 
  • the tourist comes to an overcrowded, poverty stricken country, taking up any and all resources that could have gone to the little native girl
  • the soldier comes to fight for his country, but ends up killing the innocent girl, probably in her village.
  • the little boy dies under the doctor’s knife
  • the man kills the little girl in a school shooting (represented with the uniform)
  • the “fat” kid is killed by obesity caused by a fast food epidemic in america, most commonly mcdonald’s, shown by ronald mcdonald himself. 

this is /haunting/ to look at. children can die at anyone’s hand. even the “heros”

Actually, the tourist that is being depicted here is most likely a sex tourist. Child sex tours are a big business across Asia and the Pacific.

The little boy and the doctor could very well be depicting organ harvesting, which is another popular form of human trafficking (note the cooler next to the doctor).

(Source: sssleepyhead, via inediblemadness)

muskming:

Frida

2002 film directed by Julie Taymor

(via mr-vee)

The Transracial Adoptee: White adoptive parents and race

incognitohappenings:

image

Point: It’s not easy having adoptive parents who don’t see race and don’t know how to talk about race. 

The fact is, white adoptive parents — especially mine — are under-equipped to broach the subject on race relations in America. 

They don’t have the language to start a discussion around race simply because the experience of race is irrelevant to their lives (see Peggy McIntosh’s article on white privilege). As individuals of race and class privilege, they are blissfully unaware of the day-to-day struggles people of color must endure.

Most likely, if I were to bring up the topic of microagressions and the frequency in which I experience them, they would not know what to say. It’s not easy to be forgiving of that because much of their silence around race is what brings me the most emotional pain as an adoptee.

Which brings me to my next point, if my adoptive parents never talked about race then how was I able to combat racist and derogatory remarks growing up in a predominantly white community?

I wasn’t able to.

Adoptive parents who are not willing to discuss race relations honestly and openly with their transracially adopted child do the child the ultimate disservice by ignoring a discussion integral to the child’s identity development. As stated in Darron T. Smith’s article:

"…adoptees often experience daily racial micro-aggressions that are typically "unseen" or misinterpreted by the white parent, thus leaving them exposed without developing effective coping strategies in a life-long battle for their racial identity."

A few years back, I experienced an unpleasant situation in which I was faced with a very racist remark by an ex-boyfriend’s buddy. I was sitting at a bar with my white boyfriend, surrounded by his white male bandmates, drinking a beer. Suddenly, the topic of relocating came up and the lead vocalist started to speak about his experience moving to a city suburb in the next state. He said, “I was talking with some woman about moving to (insert town name here) and she said, ‘No, don’t move there, a lot of Filipinos live there’”. I sat there not knowing what to say, feeling confused and distinctly uncomfortable while my ex-boyfriend and his bandmates chuckled around me. 

For hours after, I replayed the scene in my head trying to think of a response to his statement and found I couldn’t. It didn’t help that my ex-boyfriend downplayed the statement and trivialized my experience of it by saying, “He probably didn’t mean it. He was just making an observation.” (Now you know why he’s an ex.)

This situation, among many others, were moments in which I didn’t know how to defend myself or loudly state my discomfort. In hindsight, it was because I didn’t have the language to describe my distress. Luckily, this language is something I’ve slowly discovered in college by reading literature on transracial adoption and speaking with other adoptees — this language has helped me articulate my experience as an adoptee and has paved a way towards claiming a racial identity; however, I’m sure I would have been more equipped to handle a situation such as that or less surprised by it if my home life had consisted of a healthy dose of race discussion.

It will be a long journey before my adoptive parents and I come to an understanding of each others’ experiences. There will be anger, tears, and frustration. Talking about race is tough regardless of family makeup. However, in an interracial family, race discussion MUST be normalized to ensure the healthy identity development of a transracially adopted child.